60-Second Civics

Sunday, February 28
   Daily civics quiz
Roughly how many people in the United States today have conviction histories?

 
 
 
 

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About the Podcast: 60-Second Civics is a daily podcast that provides a quick and convenient way for listeners to learn about our nation’s government, the Constitution, and our history. The podcast explores themes related to civics and government, the constitutional issues behind the headlines, and the people and ideas that formed our nation’s history and government.

60-Second Civics is produced by the Center for Civic Education. The show's content is primarily derived from the Center’s education for democracy curricula, including We the People: The Citizen and the Constitution, Foundations of Democracy, and Elements of Democracy.

Subscribe: It's easy to subscribe! Listen on YouTubeiTunes or Stitcher or subscribe via RSS.

Get Involved: Join the conversation about each episode on Twitter. Or you can contact the show by emailing Mark Gage. Let me know what you think!

You Can Help: 60-Second Civics is supported by private donations. You can help keep the podcasts coming by donating, buying an ebook, or by writing a nice review in iTunes to help others discover the show. We love our listeners. You are the reason we created the podcast. Thank you for your kind support!

Music:
The theme music for 60-Second Civics is provided by Cheryl B. Engelhardt. You can find her online at cbemusic.com. The song featured on the podcast is Cheryl B. Engelhardt's "Complacent," which you purchase on iTunes, along with all of Cheryl's music.


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60-Second Civics: Episode 4270, Mass Incarceration: Black History Month, Part 28
According to today's guest, Hernandez Stroud, counsel for the Justice Program of the Brennan Center for Justice at the NYU School of Law, mass incarceration has "decimated the lives of black and brown people and communities." Learn more about the problem of mass incarceration and how it began on today's extra-long bonus episode of the 60-Second Civics podcast.

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60-Second Civics: Episode 4269, Brown v. Board of Education: Black History Month, Part 27
On today's extra-long episode, special guest Hernandez Stroud, counsel for the Justice Program of the Brennan Center for Justice at the NYU School of Law, explains the historical context of the two Brown v. Board of Education decisions.

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60-Second Civics: Episode 4268, Thurgood Marshall: Black History Month, Part 26
Thurgood Marshall was the first African American justice appointed to the U.S. Supreme Court. Learn about his remarkable life as told by Hernandez Stroud, counsel for the Justice Program of the Brennan Center for Justice at the NYU School of Law.

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60-Second Civics: Episode 4267, Highlander Folk School: Black History Month, Part 25
The Highlander Folk School in Tennessee trained many civil rights activists in the 1950s. It established the Citizenship Training Program, also known as Citizenship Schools, which educated hundreds of African Americans in the South about their voting rights and how to take political action in the 1950s and 1960s.

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60-Second Civics: Episode 4266, The Civil Rights Movement: Black History Month, Part 24
The civil rights movement, which was led by African Americans, involved men and women of many backgrounds and ethnicities who took to the streets to end segregation and to press for civil, political, and economic rights for African Americans.

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60-Second Civics: Episode 4265, Rosa Parks: Black History Month, Part 23
Rosa Parks is best known for refusing to give up her seat on a segregated bus in Montgomery, Alabama, but she fought against injustice her entire life.

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60-Second Civics: Episode 4264, Segregation: Black History Month, Part 22
Segregation was meant to ensure not only the separation of African Americans from whites, but also a system of white supremacy. This was given legal cover by the 1896 decision of Plessy v. Ferguson. Persistent racial violence against African Americans enforced the social norms of white supremacy and resulted in the deaths of thousands.

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60-Second Civics: Episode 4263, The Failure of Reconstruction and the Rise of Jim Crow: Black History Month, Part 21
The victory of the Union over the Confederacy and the passage of the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, and Fifteenth Amendments did not mean an end to racism in the United States. Federal troops that were meant to ensure the equal enforcement of the laws were sent back to their barracks in 1877. This ended Reconstruction and began the era known as Jim Crow, where Southern states passed laws to subjugate African Americans. Jim Crow would last until the 1960s.

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60-Second Civics: Episode 4262, The Civil War Amendments: Black History Month, Part 20
The Civil War Amendments were passed in response to attempts by former Confederate states to limit the rights of African Americans. The Thirteenth Amendment abolished slavery. The Fourteenth Amendment recognized African Americans as citizens and forbade states from denying due process or equal protection of the laws and from abridging the privileges or immunities of citizens. The Fifteenth Amendment protected the rights of African American men to vote.

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60-Second Civics: Episode 4261, The Thirteenth Amendment and the Black Codes: Black History Month, Part 19
The Thirteenth Amendment finally abolished slavery throughout the entire United States. But African Americans' struggle for equality faced daunting obstacles, such as the vicious and discriminatory Black Codes, which were laws passed to ensure the continued subjugation of formerly enslaved people.

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