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Click on the questions below for the answer.
 
Q: How do I contact someone at the Center?
A:  The most direct way to reach us is by telephone at our main office in California: 800-350-4223. The operator will direct your call to the appropriate staff member. To contact staff in Washington, D.C., call 202-861-8800. Email contacts may be made to individual departments. A list of these addresses is available here.

Q: How can I support civic education?
A: There are many ways to support civic education in your community. Show your commitment to our nation’s founding principles by volunteering, making a donation, or endorsing the work of the Center.

Q: Are the Center's materials available in Braille, large-type, or audio format?
A:  The Center receives requests for Braille or large-type transcriptions and recordings of our textbooks several times during every school year. While the Center does not provide such copies or recordings, the organizations listed below can do so.

The American Printing House for the Blind provides large-format and Braille transcriptions: 1-800-223-1839 or http://www.aph.org.

Learning Ally provides audio versions of Center textbooks:

E-mail: Custserv@LearningAlly.org
Phone: 800-221-4792
Fax: 609-987-8116
Website: https://audiobooks.learningally.org/
Q: As a past participant of the We the People program, is there a way I can stay connected to the Center?
A:  Yes, there are opportunities for students who have taken part in the program to continue working with us and maintain connections. Read all about the We the People Alumni Network and see what you can do!

Q: How do I find out about the Center’s professional development opportunities?
A:  The Center provides opportunities for professional development for individuals at all levels of involvement in our programs. For details on upcoming trainings, workshops, content seminars, institutes, and conferences offered by Center programs, click here.

Q: I love your programs! How can I volunteer?
A: Visit our Volunteer page by clicking here.

Q: Can I obtain a review copy of your textbooks?
A:   Unfortunately as a nonprofit organization with limited funds for free distribution of materials, we cannot honor requests for review copies of Center publications. However, sample lessons of many of the Center's materials are available for review on our Lesson Plans page and on our Presidents' Day page.
Q: How can I buy your textbooks?
A:  You can place an order by mailing or faxing us a purchase order. Domestic shipping is 12% of the total purchase price (Hawaii, Alaska, APOs and International destinations are subject to additional charges). If you would like to use a credit card, you can do so by calling us at 818-591-9321 or ordering from our Online Store.
Q: I’m interested in research studies on the efficacy of your programs. What information is available to me?
A:  Several important quantitative and qualitative studies have been conducted on the Center’s programs. We have presented them, along with a selection of papers and speeches, here.
Q: Does the Center have a voting curriculum?
A: Yes! Citizens, Not Spectators is a voter education program for high school and elementary students. The curriculum focuses on hands-on, active learning. Using actual voter registration forms and ballots, students receive instruction in how to register and cast a vote in a simulated election. Citizens, Not Spectators is produced by the Center for Civic Education and the Ludwick Family Foundation. For more information, click here.

Q: How can I subscribe or unsubscribe to your mailing list?
To subscribe to the Center's mailing list, send an email to web@civiced.org with the word "Subscribe" in the subject line.

To unsubscribe, click here.
Q: What is Representative Democracy in America: Voices of the People?
A: Representative Democracy in America is an introduction for young people to the representatives, institutions, and processes that serve to realize the goal of a government of, by, and for the people. Grades K-12. More information available here.

Q: What is Foundations of Democracy?
A:  Foundations of Democracy is an interdisciplinary curriculum based on four concepts fundamental to understanding constitutional democracy: authority, privacy, responsibility, and justice. Grades K-12. For details, click here.
Q: What are the Civitas International Programs?
A: Civitas International Programs bring civic education curricula to students worldwide in partnership with organizations in the United States and in eighty countries. This network of educators, civil society organizations, educational institutions, and governmental agencies has worked for more than a decade to develop quality curricular materials and train teachers throughout Eastern Europe, the former Soviet Union, Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean, and the Middle East. Many countries in the Civitas network collaborate in unique partnerships using model civic education programs from the United States and other countries to develop programs that address their specific civic education needs.

For more details click here.
Q: What is the School Violence Prevention Demonstration Program?
A:  The School Violence Prevention Demonstration Program is designed to improve students’ civic knowledge, skills, and attitudes by engaging them in high-quality civic education and group-participation exercises. For more details, click here.
Q: What is the Center for Civic Education?
A:  The Center for Civic Education is a nonprofit, nonpartisan educational corporation dedicated to promoting an enlightened and responsible citizenry committed to democratic principles and actively engaged in the practice of democracy in the United States and other countries. The Center specializes in civics and citizenship education, law-related education, and international educational exchange programs for developing democracies.  For more information click here.

Q: What is We the People: The Citizen and the Constitution?

 

A:  We the People is an instructional program that enhances students’ understanding of the institutions of American constitutional democracy. Students discover the contemporary relevance of the Constitution and Bill of Rights. The program’s culminating activity is a simulated congressional hearing in which students testify before a panel of judges. Students demonstrate their knowledge and understanding of constitutional principles and have opportunities to evaluate, take, and defend positions on relevant historical and contemporary issues. Grades 4-12. For details, click here.

 

Q: What is We the People: Project Citizen?
A:  Project Citizen is a curricular program for middle, secondary, and post-secondary students, youth organizations, and adult groups that promotes competent and responsible participation in local and state government. Project Citizen helps participants learn how to monitor and influence public policy. In the process, they develop support for democratic values and principles, tolerance, and feelings of political efficacy. Grades 5-12. For details, click here.

Many international partners have also chosen to adapt curricular materials originally developed in the United States. The most widely adapted materials include the Project Citizen and Foundations of Democracy texts developed by the Center for Civic Education.